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Feb 3 17 1:54 PM

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A downer at birth

The answer is :

DON”T MOVE THE PATIENT UNLESS IT IS ABSOLUTLY NECESSARY.

And that applies to both people and animals or you could do more harm then good.


OK, here's the thing IMO.

Pain is there to tell her/you not to do what you are trying to do. When the pain lessens, then you will be able to do what you want to do.

The 3 most common things that causes a downer after giving birth are:

A. exhaustion ( pain is not a real factor )

The cow is just plain old worn out. She doesn't have enough energy left to get up.

So the treatment is: give her water and nothing else to hydrate her and give her time to rejuvenate herself to get up on her own. A small amount of pelletized feed is permissible three times a day, but no hay as it will cause her to push to defecate. This could take up to 1 day.

B. Sciatica, pain is a factor, and is stopping her from getting up so the treatment is the same as above.

This could keep her down for 2 days or more. If she shows signs of an honest attempt to get up, aspirin can be administered for pain and inflammation, if you don't have a vet available.

C. pelvic injury. Pain is a factor and she should be on continual aspirin as prescribed, or as the vet prescribes. This could last for as much as a week for healing. If you can determine only exhaustion is the only cause she is a downer, then and only then should you attempt to get her to her feet or you most likely will hinder the healing or cause more damage.

Far aspirin I use:

https://www.chewy.com/animed-aniprin-f-aspirin-usp/dp/135317?gclid=CjwKEAiA8dDEBRDf19yI97eO0UsSJAAY_yCSNObM8mXd4zz1B_x4fPpS48gAZ2qjKPDVijpGPR7DAxoCNk_w_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds

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